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Welcome to Boneheads Bullies.....
We are English Bulldog and Olde English Bulldogge Breeders

What we breed for in a Bulldog: a medium sized very stocky thick build, with a short back, bully appearance, short nose (very bully), red/liver or black nose, extreme muscle tone, agile, good breathers, and conformationally correct english bulldog. To us porpotion matters more than the size of the bulldog. We see a lot of breeders that have english bulldogs and olde english bulldogge that have super long backs, tiny bone, and pointer noses... that is NOT OUR TYPE OF BULLDOG! All of our englsh bulldogs and olde english bulldogge are capable of living outside in the Florida heat and sun where the weather is very hot and extremely humid in the summer months, and temperatures can reach the triple digits! Take a look at our english bulldogs and our olde english bulldogges and you will see the type of consistency we breed for.

"What you see is what you get"
We want a Bulldog that we are proud to have on the end of a leash,
one that acts like a
Bulldog and looks like a bulldog !

If you are looking for a Bully dog ...we have BULLY!!!!!! We raise Olde English Bulldogs, and English Bulldogs. We have very high standards when it comes to our bullies...they must have the look, structure, temperament, and character that makes a bulldog exceptional. We occasionally have Olde English Bulldogge Puppies for sale (Old English Bulldog Puppies) and English Bulldog Puppies for sale. Please give us a call anytime...we are always up to chatting about the bulldogs!...

Tom (850)255-6192 (call anytime between 9 am to midnight central time)

Click here for Info about Boneheads Bullies & our dogs

 

 

olde english bulldogge puppies

Boneheads Bullies is located between
Pensacola Florida and Mobile Alabama

Call at Phone # (850)255-6192
anytime before midnight central time

email: bones@boneheadsbullies.com

 

 

 

 

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Boneheads Bullies breeds health tested, quality bulldog puppies.English Bulldog Puppies for sale, Olde English Bulldogge Puppies for sale, English Bulldog Puppies for sale, English bulldog puppy for sale, olde english bulldogge puppy for sale, english bulldog puppy, English bulldog pups, olde english bulldogge pups, english bulldog pups We would love to have you as a member of our bulldog puppy family. We breed for great temperament, health, and good hips. Our English Bulldog puppies are generally thick boned, short nose, (bully) and of the Bully / Johnson JDJ type. If you are interested in a purebred English bulldog puppy we strive for good health, short, stocky, and thick bulldogs with tons of wrinkles. We also breed top show quality Olde English bulldogge puppies, we like them thick, medium build, and with super short noses. We register our bulldogs with many different registries.. this normally depends on how the new owner wants their new puppy registered. Our puppies are of show quality. We register with the National Kennel Club, NKC Continental Kennel Club, CKC, International Olde English Bulldogge Association, IOEDA, AKC English Kennel Club, Our puppies come with a health guarantee and can be shipped WORLDWIDE! English Bulldog Breeder, English Bulldogs Breeder, Oldie, Olde English bulldog breeder, olde english bulldoggee breeders, english bulldog breeder, breedings, puppy, puppies, quality, health tested, temperament. Our pedigrees include: Barbosa's China Doll, Barbosa's Bulldozer Bo, Barbosa's Incredible Breeze, WAB's Bruiser Bo, Brewer's Raging Storm, JJ's Big Buster, Barbosa's All that Jazz Blackwell's Deacon, Buckeye Slammer, Peeler's Chief, Wheeler's Mean Machinette, MGK's Bam Bam, MGK's Buckeye Katie Mae, Monster Island's Disgruntled, Mullen's Bubba, Ironhead's Tequilla, Reda's Krunch, Blackwell's Black-Eyed Susan, Frank's Harley, Shawn-Kris' Harley, Shawn-Kris' Leonna, Bam Bam, MGK's Tulsa, Shawn-Kris' Poncho, Mountain Gator Red,Bullseye, Loggerhead, Destiny's Child, Dailey's Hobo, KMK Mufassa, Hot Tottie, Tug O War, Dailey's five alarm chili, Tyson, Mustang Sally, MGK Brahma the Bull, Stumpy Red, Opie won Kenobi, King Mufassa, Maple Grove's Miss Bully, MGK's Brahma the Bull, MGK's Stumpy Red, MGK's Mountain Gator Red, MGK's She's a Doozy, Johnson's Dick the Bruiser II , Manstopper's Rufus, Manstopper's Beamer, JJ's Big Buster, Barboosa's All That Jazz, WAB Bruiser Bo, Barbosa's Incredible Breeze, MGK's Bam Bam, Barboosa's All That Jazz, Manstoppers King Caleb, King Mufassa, Dailey's Mustang Pete, Dailey's Venus Man Trap, Hot Tottie, MGK Brahma the Bull, MGK'S Brahma the Bull, MGK'S Gator Red, MGK's She's a Doozy, Dailey's Tug O War, Symmes Rip n Woody, Symmes Slashin Sheena, Johnson's Dozer Bruno, Ruby Farneti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We can ship your English Bulldog puppy, Olde English Bulldog Puppy, or English Bulldog puppy anywhere including these states and cities:
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Atlanta

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Wikipedia has some extremely useful Bulldog Information: Here are some excert's from their information;
Bulldog

Alternative names British Bulldog, English Bulldog, Country of origin England

The Bulldog, colloquially known as the English Bulldog or British Bulldog, is a medium-size breed of dog that originated in England.

The bulldog is a stocky breed, with a compact body and short, sturdy limbs. Its shape results in a peculiarly unique gait. Bulldogs are known for their short muzzles and the saggy skin on their faces, creating the apparent "frown" that has become a trademark of the breed. Bulldogs come in a variety of colours and ideally have a smooth, short coat. The only disqualifier for the breed in the show ring is a liver colored nose, however a black-coated Bulldog is also not preferred. In the US, the size of a typical mature male is about 50 pounds; that for mature females is about 40 pounds. In the United Kingdom, the breed standard is 55 pounds for a male and 50 pounds for a female.

The temperament of the Bulldog is generally docile, friendly and gregarious but are known to be fiercely loyal. Breeders have worked to breed aggression out of the breed, and as such the dog is known to be of generally good temperament. Bulldogs can be so attached to home and family that they will not venture out of the yard without a human companion. Due to their friendly nature bulldogs are known for getting along well with children, other breeds of dog and any house-broken pet in general.

A bulldog is suitable for houses as well as apartments due to their size and comparative lack of energy, but puppies may be destructive until they reach maturity.
A bulldog's skull - notice the characteristic underbite (technically called mandibular prognathism)

The bulldog is prone to some health issues but no more so than most other pure breed dogs. Breathing issues can be prevalent in the breed due to the shape of the lower jaw and the shortness of muzzle - bulldogs are known to snore. In the United Kingdom, some dogs can be prone to interstitial cysts, that is cysts which form between the toes. These cause the dog some discomfort, though they are treatable either by vet or an experienced owner. Other problems can include cherry eye, certain allergies and amongst older bulldogs, hip issues.

Because of the large heads in proportion to body size, puppies are frequently delivered by Caesarean section as they can get stuck in the birth canal during natural birth, however it is not uncommon for a bulldog bitch to whelp naturally and successfully.

Bulldogs require daily cleaning of their face folds to avoid unwanted infections caused by moisture accumulation. Daily teeth brushing with a regular human soft toothbrush using a vet approved toothpaste is also recommended.

Like all dogs, Bulldogs require daily exercise. If not properly exercised the bulldog could gain weight, which could cause health problems relating to the lungs and heart. Bulldogs are extremely sensitive to heat and great care should be given to the dog during overly warm periods. During these times, ensure the dog has plenty of shade, water and should be ideally kept out of standing heat.

As the breed has developed, the tail in some dogs can be tight to the body and can cause infection if not treated or cleaned underneath regularly.

The term "bulldog" was first used around 1568[1] and might have been applied to various ancestors of modern bulldog breeds.

The oldest single breed specialty club is The Bulldog Club (England), which was formed in 1875. Members of this club met frequently at the Blue Post pub on Oxford Street in London. There they wrote the first standard of perfection for the breed. In 1891 the two top bulldogs, Orry and Dockleaf, competed in a contest to see which dog could walk the farthest. King Orry was reminiscent of the original bulldogs — lighter boned and very athletic. Dockleaf was smaller and heavier set — more like modern bulldogs. Dockleaf was declared the winner that year. Although some argued that the older version of the bulldog was more fit to perform, the modern version’s looks won over the fans of the breed because they proved they were equally as fit and athletic in the walking competition.

Recently, many people have tried to recreate a breed more akin to the original bullbaiter. Examples of the trend are the Olde Englishe Bulldogge, Renascence Bulldog, Victorian, Continental and Dorset Old Tyme Bulldog. The AKC does not recognize any of these newly "recreated" breeds of dogs.

Because of its tenacity, the bulldog is a symbol of Great Britain and is a popular mascot of English universities, such as Bowie State University, University of Georgia, Georgetown University, Alabama A&M University, Mississippi State University, Louisiana Tech University, Fresno State University, Drake University, Ferris State University, The Citadel, Yale University, Butler University, University of Minnesota Duluth, Truman State University, North Carolina A&T State University, South Carolina State University, Bryant University, Gonzaga University, University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, as well as numerous high schools throughout the USA.

It is commonly accepted that Handsome Dan, the Bulldog mascot for Yale University, is the oldest-running traditional live mascot in the United States, since some incarnation of Handsome Dan has served at Yale for more than a century.

In addition, a bulldog, named Chesty, is widely recognized as a symbol of the United States Marine Corps.

Some bulldogs and bulldog characters are notable for their accomplishments or cultural cachet.

* Hector the Bulldog, Spike the Bulldog, Butch the Bulldog and Marc Antony are animated cartoon characters in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes Merrie Melodies and Disney series of cartoons. Spike is also the name of Tom's nemesis in the MGM theatrical cartoon series Tom and Jerry. In this series, Spike was often accompanied by a puppy, his son Tyke.
* Butch is Droopy Dog's nemesis in the theatrical Droopy Dog cartoons.
* A bulldog named Cyril is the titular character in Connie Willis' Victorian time-travel comedy, To Say Nothing of the Dog.
* A bulldog named Regi starred in the feature film About a Dog, along with dog expert Ian Dickinson. Regi played a dog named Sprinkles, and two dog-mad rivals fought over Sprinkles' love.
* Dribble in Wario Ware
* Tech XIX is Louisiana Tech University's mascot.
* Uga V, a former University of Georgia mascot, was the first live college mascot to be featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine ( April 28, 1997 ) and he was also named College Mascot of the Year by Sports Illustrated magazine. Uga V also earned a co-starring role in the feature film Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, directed by Clint Eastwood. Uga V also gained notoriety in the media when during a football game on November 16, 1996 he lunged at an Auburn University receiver ( Robert Baker, #21 ) in an apparent attempt to bite the rival player and bring him down. Uga V, March 6, 1990 to November 22, 1999, was buried in Sanford Stadium with the epitaph "Defender of his Turf."
* Meaty from the MTV show Rob and Big
* Jack the Bulldog is Georgetown University's tenacious mascot.
* Handsome Dan, a bulldog, is the athletics mascot at Yale University.
* Butler Blue II, a bulldog, is the athletics mascot at Butler University.
* Winston, the English commander's pup on a beach at Normandy in "The Longest Day"
* Tyson, the famous skateboarding bulldog. He also made a cameo appearance on Rob and Big.
* Eric Byrnes of the Arizona Diamondbacks owns a bulldog named Bruin (as Byrnes is a UCLA alum). The bulldog accompanied Byrnes in McCovey Cove during the 2007 All-Star Game in San Francisco's AT&T Park.
* Matilda, who was the mascot of the British Bulldogs (Davey Boy Smith and Dynamite Kid) in the World Wrestling Federation
* Winston, who Davey Boy Smith often brought to the ring during part of his singles career in the World Wrestling Federation.
* Meatball and Matzohball, of Adam Sandler
* "Mr. Beefy" from Little Nicky
* Boomer from Scrubs, Dr. Kelso's new dog after the death of Baxter.
* Sluggo, who is owned by Ron White and is referred to in some of his comedy routines.
* Pete Wentz has a bulldog Hemingway
* Chris Potter owns a bulldog named Weezy.
* The movie Van Wilder features a well-endowed bulldog.

References

1. ^ (2003) Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary 11th edition.

External links
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Bulldog
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Bulldog

Breed Clubs by Country
Country Club Name
Australia Northern Bulldog Club of New South Wales
Brazil Bulldog Club of Brazil
Denmark The Danish Bulldog Club (in Danish)
Canada Bulldog Club of Central Canada
France Le Club du Bulldog Anglais (en Français)
Germany Allgemeiner Club für English Bulldogs (auf Deutsch)
South Africa - Pretoria Millennium Bulldog Club of Pretoria
South Africa - Cape Town The Cape Bulldog Club
Spain El Club Español del Bulldog Inglés (en español)
United Kingdom The Bulldog Club
United States The Bulldog Club of America

 

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulldog"

 

The English Bulldog is a breed of working dog developed for catching livestock and for protecting property. Though larger in size, they are the closest surviving relative of the Old English Bulldog because they were not altered to as great an extent while in Colonial America as their European cousins. There are generally considered to be two types of English Bulldog, the Johnson type and the Scott type, named after the breeders who were influential in developing them, John D. Johnson and Allen Scott. These are more commonly known as Classic or Bully type and Standard or Performance type.
Contents

English Bulldog Quick Facts

Appearance
English Bulldog, Johnson/Scott Hybrid

The English Bulldog is a stocky, strong-looking dog. Its coat is short and either white or white with patches. The Johnson type is a larger dog with a shorter muzzle than the Scott type. However, many modern English Bulldogs are a combination of the two types. In general, English Bulldogs weigh between 27 to 57 kg (60 to 125 lb) and are 52 to 70 cm (20 to 28 in) at the withers.

Confusion with other breeds

There are two distinct strains of English Bulldogs, Classic (Johnson, Bully) and Standard (Scott, Performance) which is often mistaken for its second cousin, the English Pit Bull Terrier because of its appearance, and for its much smaller European relatives because of its name. The English Bulldog is different from any of these. The English Bulldog is massive in comparison to the French Bulldog or Bulldog as it still resembles the Old English Bulldog and was never down bred to be a lap dog.

The Standard English Bulldog does resemble the pit bull-type breeds on many points, such as being muscular dogs that can be all white or white with patches. However, the pit bull's head is in the shape of a wedge coming to a more rounded point at the muzzle, whereas an English Bulldog's is box-shaped. The English Bulldog's ears are also typically uncropped, and its head is heavier and a little bulkier.

Temperament
English bulldogs can make great family dogs despite their reputation.

An English Bulldog is typically a happy, friendly, and assertive dog that is at ease with its family and fine with strangers as they get to know the stranger in question. They are quite fond of children but sometimes do not know their own strength, thus, as with all dogs, they should be supervised with small children. They bond strongly with their master and family but, because of strong guarding instincts and a somewhat dominant attitude, they need a firm but fair hand; they should be socialized and obedience trained early to expose them to other dogs and people and to ensure that they can be controlled around company as they get older and larger.

They are working dogs with high energy drives. They need room to expend their energy, and so English Bulldogs do best in a home with a backyard and preferably a "job" to do. A tired well worked bulldog is a happy bulldog. They are not always well behaved towards cats and smaller pets, but correct socialization at an early age can greatly increase the chances of them accepting these animals. This behavior is a reflection of a breed trait called prey drive. High prey drive is a desirable trait in an English Bulldog. A well bred English Bulldog is a catch dog of large herbivores. They can be stubborn with training though once they are trained they tend to obey their masters faithfully. English bulldog puppies can be relatively difficult to housebreak, thus it is important to be persistent.

History

The history of Mastiff-type dogs in the British Isles dates back beyond the arrival of Caesar, who reported of the ferocious dogs. With the arrival of the Normans in 1066 came Alaunts from the continent. The breeding of the indigenous mastiffs to the newly arrived ones produced the Mastiff and Bulldog of England. An interesting aside, is that all descriptions of the Alaunts (there were three types) mention an all white, or almost entirely white coat - a feature the English Bulldog shares with several other Mastiff-type breeds, including the all-white Dogo Argentino.

In England during the 17th and 18th centuries, bulldogs were used on farms to catch bitches and hold livestock; as butchers' dogs; and as guardians, as well as for other tasks. This eventually led to bloodsports such as bull-baiting, popular for both entertainment and the potential for gambling. These practices extended not only from the British Isles but also to the colonies she acquired during this time, including what is now the United States and in particular the South; many settlers brought their dogs with them to help around the farm, hunt in the woods, and use in gambling.

In 1835, the sport of bull-baiting was outlawed in the United Kingdom and, over time, the Bulldog there became a common pet, being bred into today's more compact and complacent version. The product was as much the efforts of selectively bred bulldogs as it was the introduction of the Pug. Conversely, the English strain maintained its utlitarian purpose, and thus underwent less modifications; even as its popularity declined in favor of other breeds. Even the slight modifications the bulldog underwent in England from the late Renaissance into the Industrial Revolution (pre 1835), were absent in the English strain. (Most settlers of the English South came from the West Midlands and as a result of the Civil War between Royalists and Parliamentarians, well before the Industrial Revolution).

Perhaps the most important role of the bulldog and the reason for its survival and in fact why it thrived through out the North was because of the presence of feral pigs, introduced to the New World and without predators[1]. The bulldogs were the settlers' only means of sufficiently dealing with the vermin. By World War II, the breed was near extinction until John D. Johnson and his father scoured the backroads of the South looking for the best specimens to revive the breed. During this time a young Alan Scott grew an interest in Mr. Johnson's dogs and began to work with him on the revitalization process. At some point, Alan Scott began infusing non-Johnson catch bulldogs from working southern farms with John D. Johnson's line creating the now Standard English Bulldog. At another point, Mr. Johnson began crossing his line with an atavistic Bulldog from the North that had maintained its genetic athletic vigor. This created a falling out between Johnson and Scott causing them to go their separate ways and breed the two significantly different versions of the English Bulldog.

Today

English Bulldogs are now safe from extinction and are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working dog or as a loving family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" (catching escaped pigs or hunting razorbacks), as cattle drovers and as working K-9s. English Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports such as schutzhund, french ring sport, street protection sport, Iron Dog(r) competition and weight pulling.
(Rajah) An English bulldog
(Rajah) An English bulldog


References

1. ^ Brief English Bulldog History - Breeders in the Northern U.S.

Further reading

* Putnam, Dave. The Working English Bulldog. California: Bulldog Press. ISBN 0-9672710-0-2.
* McDonald. The Book of the Bulldog. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0-86622-027-5.
* Jenkins, Robert. The Story of the Real Bulldog. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0-7938-0491-4.
* Miller, Lemuel. English Bulldog: Stories, facts & legends. Wildwood, Florida: Robert Beard. ISBN 1-86118-076-4.

 

* English Bulldog at the Open Directory Project - An active listing of English Bulldog links.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Bulldog"

 

+The Old English Bulldog was compact, broad and muscular as reflected in the well-known depiction Crib and Rosa. The average height was approximately 15 inches and they weighed about 45 pounds. A particular characteristic of the breed was the lower jaw that projected considerably in front of the upper jaw, which made possible a strong, vice-like grip. The nose was deeply set, which allowed the dog to get enough air as it gripped the bull.

The English blood sport of bull-baiting allowed for a specialized breed in the form of the Old English Bulldog. The main locations in London for these exhibitions were Westminster Pit, Bear Garden and Old Conduit Fields.

Breeding

Historians are fairly confident that the Old English Bulldog is derived from ancient war dogs, such as, the old Mastiff or Alaunt. Others believe that the true origin of the breed is not entirely clear. Depictions in old prints show that the variety was without doubt a small Mastiff, with a comparatively long head. The word 'Mastiff' was eventually dropped when describing these smaller Mastiffs, as the Mastiff proper was found too slow for bull-baiting. Eventually, the Greyhound was crossed into the breed increasing the mastiff's speed, without losing the breed's ferocity. This step reduced the Old English Bulldog's size and weight, with the Greyhounds features seen in specimens of that time.

Description

Two other recognized members of the breed 'Crib and Rosa' can be seen in a painting of that period, with Rosa being considered to represent perfection in the shape, make, and size of the ideal type of Old English Bulldog; however, being deficient in wrinkles about the head and neck and in substance of bone in the limbs.

References

1. ^ History of the Olde English Bulldogge

Olde English Bulldogge is a breed of dog.

History

The Olde English Bulldogge is a modern breeding back attempt at recreating the bulldogs that existed in England between 1800 and 1860, the latter commonly referred to today as the Olde Bulldog which is an extinct breed of dog. These were the early ancestors to many of the Bull breeds that exist today including the Bulldog, the English Bulldog and English Pit Bull Terrier. They were bred to participate in blood sports like bull baiting. This sport, became quite popular in England throughout the middle of the 18th Century and through much of the 19th Century. Bull baiting primarily consisted of staking out a bull and allowing several Bulldogs to attack it. A dog of great courage and agility was needed for bull baiting. This dog was of medium size; larger dogs were considered to be the result of Mastiff crosses.

Around 1835, laws were passed in England prohibiting bull baiting and the Bulldog's main purpose of existence began to diminish. Within a decade or so, the number of Bulldogs declined drastically to near extinction.[citation needed] Eventually, many Bulldog breeders were able to reduce much of the Bulldog's high drive and excessive animal aggression and began developing a much more stable, even-tempered Bulldog.[citation needed] In the 1890s, many breeders had crossed Pug into their bloodlines to create a "Bullier" look for the dog.

The modern Olde English Bulldogge is a recreation of the "Regency Period Bull Baiter" — the Bulldog that existed from 1825 to 1860. One bloodline of Olde English Bulldogge was developed by David Leavitt, of Coatesville, Pennsylvania. In 1971. Mr. Leavitt used a line breeding scheme that was designed and developed by Ohio State University for breeding cattle. The goal was to create a specific breed of Bulldogge with the look, health, and athleticism of the original bull-baiting dogs, but with a significantly less aggressive temperament. The foundation crosses consisted of ½ Bulldog, 1/6 Bullmastiff, 1/6 English Pit Bull Terrier, and 1/6 English Bulldog. After many carefully planned crosses, the Olde English Bulldogge emerged and began to breed true.

By 1985, three lines had been developed, and the breed was deemed sound, stable, and well suited for modern life. In the early 1980s Ben and Karen Campetti from Sandisfield, Massachusetts became deeply involved in breeding Olde English Bulldogges. At this time, the Campetti family began showing the breed in Molosser breed shows across the country. Through their efforts, the Olde English Bulldogge achieved much success and recognition in the Conformation ring, and spurred the interest of many rare breed fanciers, some of whom became interesting in producing the dog. It was at this point that the Olde English Bulldogge Association (O.E.B.A.) was formed to maintain proper records and implement a breeder code of ethics and standards. Detailed records of the foundation stock had been maintained and this information was converted into the O.E.B.A. registry.

One unwelcome by-product of the Olde English Bulldogge's success in the Conformation ring, obedience trials and in therapy work, was a rise in the use of the dog in Personal Protection training. This controversy displeased Mr. Leavitt and in 1995 he chose to abandon his work with the breed and pursue other interests. At this point, he turned the OEBA registry as well as his personal breeding stock over to Michael Walz, previously of Working Dog Inc. Due to issues with the Registrar and the organization itself, Olde English Bulldogge owners and breeders could not get necessary documentation for their Olde English Bulldogges.

These dogs were used very selectively in various combinations to obtain the desired physical and mental traits of the original Olde English Bulldogge. The result has been a Bulldogge of noted athletic ability. One of the distinguishing differences between an Olde English Bulldogge and another Hybrid Bulldog is its tail. As Mr. Leavitt was developing the foundation stock for his bloodline, he was insistent that his dogs should have a full pump handle tail.

Today the Olde English Bulldogge Kennel Club and Leavitt Bulldog Associationare recognized as the breed clubs of the Olde English Bulldogge and are working to protect all bloodlines. The OEBKC and the LBA are currently working in cooperation to gain UKC recognition and have adopted identical breed standards

References

* Semencic, Carl (August 1984). The World of Fighting Dogs. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0866226567.
* Semencic, Carl (April 1998). Gladiator Dogs. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0793805961.
* DePrisco, Andrew (1990). The Mini-Atlas of Dog Breeds. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0866220917.
* Brearley, Joan McDonald (1985). The Book of the Bulldog. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0-86622-027-5.
* Fogle, Bruce; Tracy Morgan (2000). The new encyclopedia of the dog. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 381. ISBN 0789461307.
* Jenkins, Robert; Ken Mollett (1997). The Story of the Real Bulldog. Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications. ISBN 0-7938-0491-4.

External links
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Olde English Bulldogge

* Leavitt Bulldog Association
* Olde English Bulldogge Kennel Club, Inc.
* English Rare Breed Association
* Molosserworld
* Dog breed info centre
* Bulldog information
* Canada's guide to dogs
* Dog resources
* The Original Purebred Bulldog ( italian-english)

 

It is commonly accepted that Handsome Dan, the Bulldog mascot for Yale University, is the oldest-running traditional live mascot in the United States, since some incarnation of Handsome Dan has served at Yale for more than a century.

In addition, a bulldog, named Chesty, is widely recognized as a symbol of the United States Marine Corps.

[edit] Notable bulldogs

Some bulldogs and bulldog characters are notable for their accomplishments or cultural cachet.

* Hector the Bulldog, Spike the Bulldog, Butch the Bulldog and Marc Antony are animated cartoon characters in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes Merrie Melodies and Disney series of cartoons. Spike is also the name of Tom's nemesis in the MGM theatrical cartoon series Tom and Jerry. In this series, Spike was often accompanied by a puppy, his son Tyke.
* Butch is Droopy Dog's nemesis in the theatrical Droopy Dog cartoons.
* A bulldog named Cyril is the titular character in Connie Willis' Victorian time-travel comedy, To Say Nothing of the Dog.
* A bulldog named Regi starred in the feature film About a Dog, along with dog expert Ian Dickinson. Regi played a dog named Sprinkles, and two dog-mad rivals fought over Sprinkles' love.
* Dribble in Wario Ware
* Tech XIX is Louisiana Tech University's mascot.
* Uga V, a former University of Georgia mascot, was the first live college mascot to be featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine ( April 28, 1997 ) and he was also named College Mascot of the Year by Sports Illustrated magazine. Uga V also earned a co-starring role in the feature film Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, directed by Clint Eastwood. Uga V also gained notoriety in the media when during a football game on November 16, 1996 he lunged at an Auburn University receiver ( Robert Baker, #21 ) in an apparent attempt to bite the rival player and bring him down. Uga V, March 6, 1990 to November 22, 1999, was buried in Sanford Stadium with the epitaph "Defender of his Turf."
* Meaty from the MTV show Rob and Big
* Jack the Bulldog is Georgetown University's tenacious mascot.
* Handsome Dan, a bulldog, is the athletics mascot at Yale University.
* Butler Blue II, a bulldog, is the athletics mascot at Butler University.
* Winston, the English commander's pup on a beach at Normandy in "The Longest Day"
* Tyson, the famous skateboarding bulldog. He also made a cameo appearance on Rob and Big.
* Eric Byrnes of the Arizona Diamondbacks owns a bulldog named Bruin (as Byrnes is a UCLA alum). The bulldog accompanied Byrnes in McCovey Cove during the 2007 All-Star Game in San Francisco's AT&T Park.
* Matilda, who was the mascot of the British Bulldogs (Davey Boy Smith and Dynamite Kid) in the World Wrestling Federation
* Winston, who Davey Boy Smith often brought to the ring during part of his singles career in the World Wrestling Federation.
* Meatball and Matzohball, of Adam Sandler
* "Mr. Beefy" from Little Nicky
* Boomer from Scrubs, Dr. Kelso's new dog after the death of Baxter.
* Sluggo, who is owned by Ron White and is referred to in some of his comedy routines.
* Pete Wentz has a bulldog Hemingway
* Chris Potter owns a bulldog named Weezy.
* The movie Van Wilder features a well-endowed bulldog.

References

1. ^ (2003) Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary 11th edition.

External links
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bulldog
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Bulldog

[edit] Breed Clubs by Country
Country Club Name
Australia Northern Bulldog Club of New South Wales
Brazil Bulldog Club of Brazil
Denmark The Danish Bulldog Club (in Danish)
Canada Bulldog Club of Central Canada
France Le Club du Bulldog Anglais (en Français)
Germany Allgemeiner Club für English Bulldogs (auf Deutsch)
South Africa - Pretoria Millennium Bulldog Club of Pretoria
South Africa - Cape Town The Cape Bulldog Club
Spain El Club Español del Bulldog Inglés (en español)
United Kingdom The Bulldog Club
United States The Bulldog Club of America

 

Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog

The Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog (ABBB) or Otto is an English rare dog breed, developed in the Alapaha River region of Southern Georgia.

Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog Quick Facts

Appearance

Displaying an unexaggerated and natural bulldog type, the Alapaha is nevertheless a sturdy, well-developed, and muscular breed. Descriptions of its size vary greatly, calling for males anywhere from 65 to 90 pounds (32 to 45 kg) standing 19 to 26 inches (48 to 73.5 cm) at the withers, females smaller at 60 to 70 pounds (22.5 to 41 cm). Ears and tail are natural, with no cropping or docking. Colors of the Alapaha are varied, typically white or different shades of black, grey, red, fawn, brindle, brown, buckskin, or mahogany, always with white markings; some dogs are piebald spotted.

History

The breed was developed by the Lane family of Rebecca, Georgia, out of stock that originated on the Paulk plantation near the town of Alapaha, in a sustained effort over many decades to preserve the"plantation dog" of south Georgia from extinction. Detractors say that the ABBB is identical to the English Bulldog and that nothing distinctive is found in the Otto. Alapaha owners appear to disagree and photos seem to indicate a fairly distinct type.

Books

* McDonald, Joan. The Book of the Bulldog, Neptune, NJ:TFH Publications, ISBN 0-86622-027-5
* Jenkins, Robert. The Story of the Real Bulldog Neptune, NJ: TFH Publications, ISBN 0-7938-0491-4

 

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